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Berne Convention for the protection of Literary and Artistic Works, 1979

Berne Convention for the protection of Literary and Artistic Works, 1979



Summary

The first text of the Berne Convention for the protection of literary and artistic works was signed in 1979 in order to protect copyrights. Under this Convention the author receives an international protection to his or her rights to control his or her creative works and to receive a payment for them. This includes novels, stories, poems, theatre, songs, lyrics, magazines, works of drawing and paintings, sculptures and architecture.

This Convention, usually known as Berne Convention, started a new attempt towards the authors’ rights, as well as towards national and international legislation on author’s rights. The Berne Convention was subsequently completed in Paris in 1896; Berlin in 1908; Berne in 1914; Roma in 1928; Brussels in 1948; Roma in 1961; Stockholm in 1967; and one correction in 1979.

The Berne Convention in its 38 articles covers divers issues related to the protection of the artistic works or copyright, such as the obligation to protect; beneficiaries of protection; guaranteed rights; moral rights; rights of adaptation; rights of reproduction; rights of translation, among others. In appendix special provisions regarding developing countries are made.

The Convention guarantees protection of rights of authors and their entitled beneficiaries in all the countries of the Union. To benefit from the protection, an author must be national of one of the countries of the Union, or have his works first published in a State of the Union, or usually reside in a State of the Union, without prejudice to special provisions in respect of cinematographic or architectural works.

Documents

Berne Convention for the protection of Literary and Artistic Works, 1979

September 2010

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